Materials Transformed

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12
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The forests of British Columbia provide raw materials for a wide variety of First Nations clothing, regalia, basketry, containers and art works. Materials introduced through the early fur trade, such as beads and fabrics, were incorporated into this rich and varied production as well. These artistic traditions continue.

Beadwork and Embroidery of the Cold Forests

Athapaskan-speaking peoples of the Cold Forests transformed trade materials such as beads and cloth into creations that were both practical and beautiful.

 

Image 1
This is a photograph of a pair of Dakelh boots with fur trim and embroidery.

Image 2
This is a photograph of one Dakelh legging made of hide, beads and cloth.

Image 3
This is a photograph of a Sekani game bag made of beads, cloth and hide, with an option to zoom in.

Image 4
This is a photograph of a Sekani tobacco or shot pouch made of beads, cloth and hide, with an option to zoom in.

Image 5
This is a photograph of a Tahltan pouch made of beads, cloth and hide, with an option to zoom in.

Image 6
This is a photograph of a white Kaska bag made of cloth, hide and red flowers of embroidery thread, with an option to zoom in.

Image 7
This is a photograph of a Dene-thah jacket by Mrs. Harry Dickie, of Nelson Forks, made of embroidery thread, beaver fur and hide, with an option to zoom in.

Image 8
This is a photograph of an Athapaskan-style octopus bag made of cloth and beads.

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Materials Transformed - 
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