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NATURE
· Vanishing Natural Habitat
FIRST PEOPLES
· First Nations in the City
HISTORY
· Seeking a New Home
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FOCUS  Vancouver and Victoria

First Nations in the City
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This is a black and white photograph of Chief Mungo Martin in traditional dress taken from the torso up.
Chief Mungo Martin (ca. 1881 – 1962). Jim Ryan, RBCM PN 13492.
Thunderbird Park

Year-round, the Royal British Columbia Museum's Thunderbird Park illustrates the coming together of First Nations images and traditions within the modern city. The park displays totem poles in the styles of many First Nations, which were carved by the Kwakwa̱ka̱'wakw carver, Chief Na̱ḵaṕa̱nka̱m (Mungo Martin). Mungo Martin came to Victoria in 1952 to start a carving program at Thunderbird Park and to replicate some of the poles in the museum's collection. In 1953 he built Wawaditła, a smaller version of a traditional bighouse that once stood in Tsax̱is (Fort Rupert), with the assistance of his son-in-law, Henry Hunt, and Hunt's sons, Tony and Richard.
Wawaditła, the Mungo Martin House, in Thunderbird Park. Mungo Martin carved the heraldic pole in 1952 to represent all of the Kwakwa̱ka̱'wakw nations. RBCM PN 13195-10.
This is a black and white photograph of Wawaditła, the Mungo Martin House, in Thunderbird Park with the heraldic pole.
View of Thunderbird Park, 1977, showing the entrance arch, replicas of Kwakwa̱ka̱'wakw poles and the Haida-style carving shed with replica of a Haida house frontal pole.RBCM PN13195-11.
This is a black and white photograph of Thunderbird Park showing totem poles and carving shed.
Mungo Martin painting a mask at Thunderbird Park, ca. 1953. R. Kirkman, RBCM PN 13327.
This is a black and white photograph of Mungo Martin painting a mask at Thunderbird Park.
Over the years, many First Nations artists took part in the carving program. Some, like the late Art Thompson (Ditidaht), went on to become internationally renowned and respected artists. The carving program enables First Nations artists to study traditional carving and painting techniques while providing the general public with accurate information about the cultural property of First Nations people.
Mungo Martin, Tony Hunt and Henry Hunt at Thunderbird Park with pole commissioned on behalf of the Government of Canada for presentation to Mexico, 1961. BC Government Travel Bureau, RBCM PN 15843.
This is a black and white photograph of Mungo Martin, Tony Hunt and Henry Hunt at Thunderbird Park with pole.
The most recent pole in Thunderbird Park was raised in 1999 to honour the families of the two Kwakwa̱ka̱'wakw carvers, Henderson and Whonnock, and is dedicated to the Coast Salish people. Olive Quale, RBCM PN 23143.3a.
This is a photograph of a pole in Thunderbird Park dedicated to the Coast Salish people, with bird image on top, museum in background.
First Nations in the City - 
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